How To Make The Balloons An Emergency Cell Service In Peru After An 8.0 magnitude earthquake

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Loon

After the recent earthquake, Lun helped connect more than 20,000 people to each other.
On weekends, a strong 8.0 earthquake hit Peru and neighboring Ecuador.  Earthquake felt in rural areas and Lima, Quito and even Caracas, Venezuela-one person killed in major population centers, wounded in 18 countries, and numerous buildings have been damaged.

But unlike Peru’s most powerful earthquake for a decade, this disaster was a significant difference among others: within 48 hours, people in the affected areas used to work cell phones.  A company owned by the alphabet, Lun, placed its signature LTE balloon, which was able to provide services to a broken network.

  Through a relentless chance, Lun was checking his balloons in Puerto Rico.  The company works to establish relief efforts with both the Peruvian government and cell service provider Telephony.

  “After the request of the Peruvian government and the telephonica government,” a press statement said, “We re-ordered a group of balloons in the fast-moving area. On the first Tuesday morning, the first balloon arrives and there are more ways to start LTE for users.”

  According to the company, Lun “took the most essential element of a cell tower and redesigned to be able to be portable enough and durable by a balloon of 20 cm (12.42 miles, located on the outer space).”

The balloons are made from polyethylene sheets and near the size of the tennis court.  Armed with antenna powered by solar panels and connected to ground stations, the balloons can create a network of counterfeit networks above a region.

  Lun sent a balloon from Peru from Puerto Rico to Peru, creating invisible chains in the air and establishing a network in the affected areas.  One balloon received a signal from ground-based infrastructure on the ground and then jumped with nine balloons until the signal reached the end.  Each balloon covers approximately 1,930 square miles (5,000 sq km).

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North of Lun’s network in Peru.  The network passes its signal until it is established within 48 hours.

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